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All Vaccines Available
in the United States

An overview of vaccines and the diseases they prevent

While vaccine-preventable disease rates are low in the United States, many children, adolescents, and adults remain unprotected.88 Here's a look at all vaccines that are available in the United States. Browse through them to see which vaccines you and your loved ones need most.

Vaccines that can protect yourself and your family

Image: Use this tool to see which vaccines can protect different members of your family.
Chickenpox Vaccine

Chickenpox (varicella) vaccine

Chickenpox causes an
itchy rash all over the body
with red spots and blisters. Complications include
bacterial infection of the skin, pneumonia, brain damage, and death.89

Read more at cdc.gov
Diphtheria Vaccination

Diphtheria vaccination

Diphtheria can attack the tonsils, throat, and voice box. It can start out with a sore throat and trouble swallowing, and lead to breathing problems, heart failure, and death.78

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Flu Vaccine

Flu (influenza) vaccine

Many people don't realize that the flu can lead to pneumonia, bronchitis, and sinus and ear infections.51 Yearly vaccination is the best way to help protect yourself and your family.

Read more about the flu vaccine
Hib Vaccine

Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) vaccine

Hib can lead to meningitis, pneumonia, brain damage, deafness, and death.57 In the United States, a Hib outbreak occurred as recently as 2008, mostly among children who were never vaccinated or didn't finish the Hib vaccine series.90

Read more at cdc.gov
Hepatitis A Vaccine

Hepatitis A (Hep A) vaccine

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that you can get by consuming contaminated food or water. A total of 2979 cases of Hep A were reported in the United States in 2007.57

Read more at cdc.gov
Hepatitis B Vaccine

Hepatitis B (Hep B) vaccine

This serious liver disease is spread through contact with infected blood or other bodily fluids. It can be transmitted several ways, including sharing a toothbrush or razor, unprotected sexual contact, tattooing, and body piercing.91

Read more about the hepatitis B vaccine
Measles Vaccination

Measles vaccination

The United States is in the middle of its biggest measles epidemic in 15 years.11 Measles is spread through coughing, sneezing, or even talking, and it's extremely contagious.92

Read more at cdc.gov
HPV Vaccine

HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States. However, many people who have HPV show no symptoms, so an infected person may not know he or she is spreading it to a partner.61

Read more about the HPV vaccine
Meningitis Vaccine

Meningitis (meningococcal) vaccine

College students aren't the only ones who may be at greater risk for meningococcal disease.52 Anyone can get it. Although rare, meningococcal disease moves quickly and is often fatal.55

Read more at cdc.gov
Mumps Vaccination

Mumps vaccination

Mumps is a viral disease. It's less contagious than measles, but spreads the same way, through coughing, sneezing, and even talking.93

Read more at cdc.gov
Polio Vaccine

Polio vaccine

Polio (short for poliomyelitis) is a highly infectious viral disease that affects the nervous system.22 Although the United States hasn't seen polio in a while, other countries still have epidemics, and the risk that it could be brought to the US remains.

Read more about the polio vaccine
Pneumococcal Vaccine

Pneumococcal vaccine

Pneumococcal disease is an acute bacterial infection that spreads through coughing and sneezing. It can cause pneumonia, meningitis, and blood infections.57

Read more at cdc.gov
Rubella Vaccination

Rubella vaccination

Rubella, also called German measles, is usually presented as a mild rash. But in some cases, it can cause miscarriage and premature birth in pregnant women, and severe birth defects in their children.30

Read more at cdc.gov
Rotavirus Vaccine

Rotavirus vaccine

Rotavirus can cause severe dehydrating diarrhea with fever and vomiting.72 In fact, it's the number 1 cause of diarrhea among infants and young children in the United States.57

Read more at cdc.gov
Tetanus Vaccination

Tetanus vaccination

Tetanus bacteria can enter a person's body through cuts, puncture wounds (like splinters and animal bites), tattooing, or body piercing, causing a very painful muscle stiffness. Because tetanus bacteria spores occur in soil almost everywhere, every unvaccinated or undervaccinated person is potentially at risk.57

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Pertussis Vaccination

Whooping cough (pertussis) vaccination

Pertussis has made a strong comeback in the United States.25 California was the state hardest hit by pertussis in 2010, with 9120 reported cases, including 10 infant deaths—a reminder why immunization is so important.24

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Shingles Vaccine

Shingles (zoster) vaccine

At least 1 million people get shingles every year in the United States. It causes a painful skin rash on the face and body, often with blisters. 1 in 5 infected people will have severe pain even after the blisters have healed.83

Read more at cdc.gov
Vaccines for Travelers

Vaccines for travelers

If you're traveling to another country, you may need vaccinations to protect you from diseases that are more common at your destination.

Read more at cdc.gov
Chickenpox Vaccine

Chickenpox (varicella) vaccine

You may think of chickenpox as a normal part of childhood, but it can be dangerous. Before the vaccine, chickenpox caused 100 to 150 deaths each year in the United States.30

Read more at cdc.gov
Diphtheria Vaccination

Diphtheria vaccination

The "D" in the Tdap, DTaP and Td vaccines stands for diphtheria. Before the vaccine, diphtheria caused more than 15,000 deaths in children in the United States during a single year.72

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Flu Vaccine

Flu (influenza) vaccine

Flu seasons vary, but each year children die from the flu. According to the CDC, during the pandemic that started in 2009, more than 340 children died from the swine flu (H1N1).73 The best way to protect against flu is to get vaccinated every year.74

Read more about the flu vaccine
Hepatitis A Vaccine

Hepatitis A (Hep A) vaccine

Hep A virus infection is a potentially serious disease you can get from consuming contaminated food or water. Some infected children may not show symptoms—a factor that plays a role in the spread of the disease.57

Read more at cdc.gov
Hepatitis B Vaccine

Hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine

Of children infected with Hep B between 1 and 5 years of age, 30% to 50% have chronic or lifelong Hep B infection that can cause serious health complications.57

Read more about the hepatitis B vaccine
Hib Vaccine

Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) vaccine

Before vaccines, Hib was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis (infection of the brain and spinal cord coverings) in children under the age of 5.57

Read more at cdc.gov
Measles Vaccination

Measles vaccination

Measles is one of the most infectious viral diseases in the world.30 Before the vaccine, nearly everyone in the United States got the measles, and today outbreaks still occur.30,62

Read more at cdc.gov
Mumps Vaccination

Mumps vaccination

Mumps is a viral disease that causes swollen glands in the neck and jaw area. Before the vaccine, mumps was a major cause of deafness and brain damage in children.30

Read more at cdc.gov
Pneumococcal Vaccine

Pneumococcal vaccine

Pneumococcal disease is a bacterial infection transmitted from an infected person. It can lead to pneumonia, meningitis, blood infections, deafness, brain damage, and death.72

Read more at cdc.gov
Polio Vaccine

Polio vaccine

The US hasn't seen polio since 1979, but scientists are wondering if it could come back. From 2009 to 2010, 23 countries that had previously been certified "polio-free" were re-infected due to imported cases of the disease.22

Read more about the polio vaccine
Rubella Vaccination

Rubella vaccination

Rubella, or German measles, can cause miscarriages and premature birth in pregnant women. Before routine use of the vaccine, 20,000 infants were born with birth defects as the result of rubella from 1964 to 1965.30

Read more at cdc.gov
Rotavirus Vaccine

Rotavirus vaccine

Every year, rotavirus causes the deaths of more than 500,000 children under 5 years of age worldwide.57 This highly contagious intestinal viral disease can cause severe diarrhea with fever and vomiting, which can make children dangerously dehydrated.72

Read more at cdc.gov
Tetanus Vaccination

Tetanus vaccination

The "T" in DTaP, Tdap, and Td vaccine stands for tetanus. DTaP and Tdap vaccines also help protect infants and children against diphtheria and whooping cough, known medically as pertussis.

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Pertussis Vaccination

Whooping cough (pertussis) vaccination

Pertussis has gotten some attention recently because it is on the rise in the United States.57 Infants may not be protected against pertussis until they have received at least 3 infant doses of the infant pertussis vaccine.57,25

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Meningitis Vaccine

Meningitis (Meningococcal) Vaccine

Meningococcal disease rates are quite high among adolescents, the vaccine is also recommended for certain high-risk children 9 months to 10 years of age.55,76,77

Read more at cdc.gov
Pneumococcal Vaccine

Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPSV)

Additional doses of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV) may be recommended for certain high-risk children 24 months of age or older.49

Read more at cdc.gov
Hepatitis A Vaccine

Hepatitis A Vaccine

Additional doses of Hepatitis A (Hep A) vaccine may be recommended for certain high-risk children 24 months of age and older.49

Read more at cdc.gov
Diphtheria Vaccination

Diphtheria vaccination

Diphtheria is a bacterial infection that is spread from person to person through coughing, sneezing, and close contact.78 Adolescents are vaccinated against it with the Tdap vaccine.

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Flu (Influenza) Vaccine

Flu (Influenza) vaccine

The flu can be serious. But fortunately, it's preventable. Adolescents, along with everyone over 6 months of age, should get the flu vaccine every year.49

Read more about the flu vaccine
HPV Vaccine

HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine

At least half of all sexually active people will get HPV in their lifetime, and many won't even know it.61 It's important to vaccinate your adolescent before they become sexually active.

Read more about the HPV vaccine
Meningitis Vaccine

Meningitis (meningococcal) vaccine

College students—particularly freshmen who live in dormitories—aren't the only ones who may be at increased risk for this potentially deadly disease. Younger adolescents may also be at risk.52

Read more at cdc.gov
Tetanus Vaccination

Tetanus vaccination

Your adolescent was probably vaccinated against tetanus as a child, but that protection wears off over time. This is why your preteen needs a booster shot known as Tdap, which also helps protect them from diphtheria, and whooping cough (pertussis).

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Pertussis Vaccination

Whooping cough (pertussis) vaccination

This highly contagious disease has been on the rise in the United States.57 Infants are most at risk, but adolescents and adults have accounted for an increasing number of cases in recent years. You can help protect your adolescent with a Tdap booster.

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Chickenpox Vaccine

Chickenpox vaccine

The chickenpox (varicella) vaccine is recommended for adolescents who haven't been previously vaccinated and have not had chickenpox. Any adolescent who was vaccinated as a child with only 1 dose should get a second dose.49

Read more at cdc.gov
Hepatitis B Vaccine

Hepatitis B vaccine

Anyone under 19 years of age who was never vaccinated against Hep B or didn't get the whole series needs catch-up vaccination.80

Read more about the hepatitis B vaccine
Measles Vaccination

Measles vaccination

The United States is in the middle of its worst measles outbreak in 15 years.81 It's more important than ever to make sure your adolescent is fully vaccinated against measles.

Read more at cdc.gov
Mumps Vaccination

Mumps vaccination

Your teen or preteen should have received 2 doses of MMR vaccine during childhood help protecting against mumps.49

Read more at cdc.gov
Polio Vaccine

Polio vaccine

Adolescents may need a booster shot if they didn't get fully vaccinated as a child, or before traveling to a developing country with a low vaccination rate—even if they were vaccinated as children—to ensure the original vaccine series remains effective.49,29

Read more about the polio vaccine
Rubella Vaccination

Rubella vaccination

If your teen or preteen didn't receive 2 doses of MMR vaccine as a child, he or she could be at risk for rubella.92

Read more at cdc.gov
Hepatitis A Vaccine

Hepatitis A vaccine

Your adolescent may have a greater chance of getting the disease if he or she is traveling out of the country or has certain medical conditions. Lifestyle factors (such as drug use) may also increase an adolescent's risk of Hep A infection. Vaccination is recommended for adolescents who are not fully vaccinated or who are at an increased risk for infection.57

Read more at cdc.gov
Pneumococcal Vaccine

Pneumococcal vaccine

Adolescents who smoke, have asthma, sickle cell disease, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, are at high risk of complications from pneumococcal disease and should get vaccinated. Because protective antibodies often decline, revaccination may be needed.57

Read more at cdc.gov
Diphtheria Vaccination

Diphtheria vaccination

The Tdap vaccine helps to protect adults against diphtheria, which can lead to breathing problems, heart failure, and death.78 The CDC currently recommends a single booster dose of Tdap vaccine for adults.85

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Flu Vaccine

Flu (influenza) vaccine

Each year, on average 36,000 Americans die from flu-related complications, and another 226,000 are hospitalized.124,83 So not only could the flu keep you out of work; it could also be deadly.59

Read more about the flu vaccine
Shingles Vaccine

Shingles (Zoster) vaccine

Shingles, a reactivation of the same virus that causes chickenpox, causes a painful, blistered skin rash on the body or face. If you've had chickenpox or have been vaccinated against it, you can get shingles.83

Read more at cdc.gov
Tetanus Vaccination

Tetanus vaccination

A lot of adults, especially those over 60 years of age, aren't protected against tetanus. This is why adults should get a tetanus booster every 10 years.83

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Pertussis Vaccination

Whooping cough (pertussis) vaccination

Infants may be at greatest risk for this highly contagious disease, and studies show that when the source can be identified, family members are the source of transmission in up to 83% of infant cases.57,53 This is why it's so important to get vaccinated.

Read more about the Tdap vaccine Read
Chickenpox Vaccine

Chickenpox vaccine

Chickenpox (varicella) is especially dangerous if you get it after childhood.83 If you've never had chickenpox or only received 1 dose of the vaccine, you may need another dose.85

Read more at cdc.gov
HPV Vaccine

HPV vaccine

Women 11-26 years of age who never received or finished the HPV vaccine series should get immunized. The HPV vaccine helps protect against genital warts and cervical cancer.83

Read more about the HPV vaccine
Measles Vaccination

Measles vaccination

Measles in the US is at its highest rate in 15 years.11 People born after 1957 should make sure they received the MMR vaccine, which helps to protect against this extremely contagious viral illness, plus mumps and rubella.85,11

Read more at cdc.gov
Mumps Vaccination

Mumps vaccination

Mumps is a viral disease spread through coughing, sneezing and talking.83 People born after 1957 should make sure they were fully immunized with the MMR vaccine.85

Read more at cdc.gov
Rubella Vaccination

Rubella vaccination

Rubella can cause miscarriages, premature birth in pregnant women, but most importantly, serious birth defects among their babies.83 Make sure you have been properly protected against rubella with the MMR vaccine.

Read more at cdc.gov
Hepatitis A Vaccine

Hepatitis A vaccine

Hepatitis A is a potentially dangerous virus that could lead to liver disease.83 Adults with certain risk factors should get vaccinated. This includes people with chronic liver disease and clotting-factor disorders.86

Read more at cdc.gov
Hepatitis B Vaccine

Hepatitis B vaccine

12.5 million people in the United States have been infected with Hep B, which can lead to liver cancer and death.83 You need Hep B vaccine if you belong to one of several risk groups, or simply want to help protect yourself from this serious disease.85 Talk to your health care professional to see if you are at risk.

Read more at cdc.gov
Meningitis Vaccine

Meningitis vaccine

Meningococcal meningitis is a very dangerous bacterial illness that can lead to death.83 You may need to get vaccinated if you have one of several health conditions, if you're planning on living in a college dorm for the first time, or if you visit countries where meningitis is common.86 Ask your health care provider you are at increased risk.

Read more at cdc.gov
Pneumococcal Vaccine

Pneumococcal vaccine

For adults, pneumococcal disease usually occurs as pneumonia.83 If you smoke cigarettes, or have certain medical conditions such as asthma, you may need 1-2 doses of pneumococcal vaccine.85 Check with your health care professional to see if you need pneumococcal vaccine.

Read more at cdc.gov
Chickenpox Vaccine

Chickenpox (varicella) vaccine

Chickenpox can lead to serious complications and severe disease in adults.83 Seniors who never had chickenpox or received just 1 dose of the chickenpox (varicella) vaccine may need to get vaccinated.85

Read more at cdc.gov
Diphtheria Vaccination

Diphtheria vaccination

Diphtheria is a bacterial infection spread though close contact, sneezing, and coughing. The CDC recommends that all adults, including seniors, get a Td booster for tetanus and diphtheria every 10 years.85

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Flu Vaccine

Flu (influenza) vaccine

The flu is most deadly among adults 65 years of age and older.59 Getting a flu shot every fall or winter will help protect you and the people around you.85

Read more about the flu vaccine
Pneumococcal Vaccine

Pneumococcal vaccine

Many deaths from pneumococcal disease in the United States occur among older people.83 The CDC recommends that people 65 years of age and older get 1 dose of pneumococcal vaccine, which helps protects against pneumonia.86

Read more at cdc.gov
Shingles Vaccine

Shingles (zoster) vaccine

Shingles is a painful skin rash, often with blisters that may cause pain even after they've healed. It's most common among people 50 years of age and over and those with weakened immune systems.83 If you're 60 years of age or older, you should get this vaccine.85

Read more at cdc.gov
Tetanus Vaccination

Tetanus vaccination

Many seniors aren't protected against tetanus.83 All adults, seniors included, should get a Td booster for tetanus and diphtheria every 10 years.85

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Pertussis Vaccination

Whooping cough (pertussis) vaccination

Researchers have found that, when the source can be identified, up to 83% of babies get this dangerous disease from family members, and nearly 90% of pertussis deaths occur in infants who are too young to be vaccinated.53,25 This is why seniors who have close contact with infants should receive a Tdap vaccine booster.87

Read more about the Tdap vaccine
Hepatitis A Vaccine

Hepatitis A Vaccine

Hep A usually occurs in developing countries, but it can also occur in the United States as a result of unsanitary food preparation.83 Seniors with specific risk factors should get vaccinated, including those with blood clotting disorders and chronic liver disease.86

Read more at cdc.gov
Hepatitis B Vaccine

Hepatitis B vaccine

Hep B is a serious liver disease that can lead to liver cancer and even death.83 There are several factors that could put you at higher-risk for Hep B.85 Check with your health care provider to find out if any of these factors apply to you.

Read more about the hepatitis B vaccine
MMR Vaccine

MMR vaccine

Check with your health care professional to see if you are at a greater risk of getting measles, mumps, or rubella. You may need the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine.

Read more at cdc.gov
Meningitis Vaccine

Meningitis vaccine

College students aren't the only ones who may be at greater risk for meningococcal disease..52 Anyone can get it. Although rare, meningococcal disease moves quickly and is often fatal.55

Learn more at cdc.gov